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Monday, August 27, 2007

Great Article from Fudge

My daughter Fudge managed to cobble this article together for the Observer while we were in Israel, even though she had to share the one computer with seven other people and even though it eventually exploded.

Talk about working under pressure! It's a good read, too. Reminds me why we need places like YU.

12 comments:

Ezzie said...

That was amazing, particularly as someone who has been asked many times (in all honesty and with no offense intended) where his horns were.

PsychoToddler said...

Of course, since you're a Midwesterner.

It's true; many of them are just curious to see them.

Personally, I think that teacher would benefit from a trip through the Bet Hatfutzot in Tel Aviv. But then again, so would many Jews.

Shmiel said...

Hey, that young scholar is quite a writer. Does she intend on becoming a health professional of some sort too?

Doctor Bean said...

You've reproduced well, my friend. She's a gifted writer and brainy to boot.

Shmiel: why would you wish such a thing on her? I hope she can do something that makes her lots of money and alows her to help people.

Doctor Bean said...

PS: I grew up in Orange County (Southern California) among virtually no Jews. I was not affiliated with Jewish stuff and was basically secular. Nevertheless, a lot of people knew I was a Jew, and I never heard the "horns" question. I ran into a lot of hostility because I was an introverted socially awkward dork, but as far as I can tell none because I was a Jew. Perhaps the Midwest is a whole 'nother thing.

PsychoToddler said...

Southern California is not "the real world."

rivkayael said...

I liked her article. It reminds me of some of the attitudes I've encountered with the other side of my heritage.

At an admissions interviewee:
Chinese interviewee: Wow, there are so many weird people at [YU professional program where she worked].
RY (who did not disclose other side of heritage): Umm, you mean Orthodox Jews?
CI: Yes! [Program here] is so much more normal.
RY (who is an OJ): umm...

Occasionally I also hear some fairly interesting comments from people who don't know...yes it makes me feel very grateful for places like YU, or even being able to live in NY.

Ezzie said...

But then again, so would many Jews.

That's true of a lot of places.

Scraps said...

As another native of a SmallTown, USA, I can relate to this article very well. I never set foot in a kosher restaurant until I was nearly 13; I went to school with kids who were Conservative, Reform, unaffiliated, and non-Jewish, depending on the school and the year. I always had to face the looks, the questions, explaining to teachers why I couldn't come to school for a good part of September and October, etc. B"H I rarely, if ever, encountered overt anti-Semitism, but that could have to do with the part of the country I'm from. I did have classmates who were firmly convinced that I (or my ancestors, anyway) killed their god, and that I was going to hell. Very, very different from what most people in the greater NY area are used to...

Shira Salamone said...

I consider myself fortunate--the only person who ever called me a dirty Jew (when I was around 14)turned out to be a fugitive from the juvenile delinquent system and was taken back into custody!

Fudge is a wonderful writer. I hope she makes a good living at it, someday.

"Spam-trapper" letters: ipoasl. An Initial Public Offering of American Sign Language? I wasn't aware that the American Deaf Community had put its native language up for sale. :)

Tzippy said...

Fudge is an awesome girl (and puts up with me telling her what I think of her father's blog). But I wouldn't go so far as giving YU all the credit for it. She's the exception, rather than the rule.

PsychoToddler said...

Well, obviously, the bulk of the credit goes to me.

OUCH!

I mean, er, her mother.